Prograf

Prograf Medication Information:

Price Break On Prograf
Generic is available for less money: Generic Tacrolimus ointment

Prograf medication comes in several different strengths; click on the strength you need to view prices from pharmacies competing to earn your business.

Prograf 0.500 mg
Prograf 1 mg
Prograf 5 mg

About Prograf

You have received a prescription for Prograf capsules from your doctor. As you know, you need special medication, every day, to help keep your transplanted organ healthy and functioning. Prograf is a drug that is used to help your body accept your transplanted organ.

IT IS VERY IMPORTANT that you read the following information carefully. Your doctor, nurse, and pharmacist have explained Prograf to you, and this information will answer some of the questions you may have about your new medication. The success of treatment with this drug depends on how carefully you follow your doctor’s instructions. As you review this information, write down any questions that you may have. Then, talk with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist. This information should not replace your doctor’s or pharmacist’s advice.

What Prograf is used for

Prograf is the brand name for tacrolimus. You may have also heard it called FK506. Prograf is an immunosuppressant that is used concomitantly with adrenal corticosteroids to prevent or treat rejection of your transplanted organ.

What Prograf does

Your body’s immune system is your defence system. Immunity is the way your body protects itself from infections and other foreign material. When you receive a transplant, your immune system recognizes the transplanted organ as foreign and will try to reject it. Prograf is an anti-rejection drug that helps your body accept your transplanted organ(s).

When Prograf should not be used

Prograf may cause fetal abnormalities and malformations. For this reason it is recommended that you do not take Prograf if you are, or become, pregnant. You must use a reliable method of birth control before, during your treatment and for 6 weeks after stopping your treatment with Prograf. Should you become pregnant during the time you are taking Prograf, you should inform your doctor at once. However, never stop taking Prograf without first consulting your doctor.

Breast-feeding is not recommended while taking Prograf.

What the medicinal ingredient is

  • tacrolimus

What the important nonmedicinal ingredients for Prograf are

  • Lactose Monohydrate, NF

  • Magnesium Stearate, NF

For a full listing of nonmedicinal ingredients see Part 1 of the product monograph.

What dosage forms Prograf comes in

Prograf is available in one-half milligram capsules, 1 milligram capsules and 5 milligram capsules. The 0.5 mg capsules are light yellow and oblong with “0.5 mg” written on the capsule top. The 1 mg capsules are white and oblong, with “1 mg” written on the capsule top. The 5 milligram capsules are grayish/red, oblong, and have “5 mg” written on the capsule top.


Warnings and Precautions

Increased susceptibility to infection and the possible development of lymphoma may result from immunosuppression.

BEFORE you use Prograf be sure you have told your doctor the following:

  • If you have taken Prograf, FK506 or tacrolimus before and had a bad, unusual or allergic reaction;

  • About all other medicines or treatments you use, including any products you buy off the shelf such as over-the-counter drugs and herbal or home remedies;

  • About all other health conditions you have now, or have had in the past;

  • If you are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breastfeeding a baby: Pregnancy should be avoided while taking Prograf because its effect on pregnancy or on an unborn baby is not known. Breast-feeding is not recommended while taking Prograf. It is important to notify your doctor right away if you become pregnant or father a child while taking Prograf.

  • It is not known what effect Prograf has on the effectiveness of vaccinations and on the risk of getting an illness from vaccination with a live vaccine. Do discuss this with your doctor before you get any vaccinations or immunizations.

Precautions

Prograf is often given with other medications. Make sure you know if you are to stop, or continue, other immunosuppressive drugs you had been taking. Be sure that you are taking the correct dose of Prograf prescribed by your doctor.

  • Be sure to keep all appointments at your transplant clinic. This is very important to help ensure that you receive the maximum benefit from your medications.

  • As with other immunosuppressive agents, owing to the potential risk of malignant skin changes, exposure to sunlight and ultraviolet (UV) light should be limited by wearing protective clothing and using sunscreen with a high protection factor.

  • Tell all health professionals you see that you are taking Prograf. It is also a good idea to wear a Medic-Alert bracelet.


Interactions with Prograf

Tell your doctor, dentist, nurse, and pharmacist about all the drugs that you are taking. Other drugs may affect the way Prograf works for you and it is important that your doctor and pharmacist knows all the medications you are taking. Do not take any other drugs without asking your doctor first. This includes anything you can buy off the shelf such as over-the-counter drugs and herbal or home remedies.

Prograf should not be taken with grapefruit or grapefruit juice.


Proper Use of Prograf

Usual dose

Your doctor will give you specific instructions about how much Prograf you should take each day. Your doctor has decided the dose you should take based on your medical condition and response to the drug. It is very important to take the exact amount of Prograf that your doctor has told you.

Once your doctor has told you when and how many times a day to take Prograf.

  • Try to take your doses at the same time every day. This will help keep the same amount of Prograf in your body so it can continue to protect your transplanted organ.

  • Space your doses of Prograf as evenly as you can throughout the day. For example, if you take Prograf twice a day, doses should be 12 hours apart. Ask your transplant nurse or pharmacist about a dosing schedule that best fits your lifestyle.

  • Prograf may be taken with or without food. But it is best to be consistent. Once you decide when you are going to take it in relation to food, do it the same way each time.

  • Swallow the capsules whole. Do not cut, crush, or chew the Prograf capsule.

Blood tests are one of the ways your doctor decides how much Prograf you need. Based on these tests and your response to Prograf, your doctor may change your dose from time to time. Do not change your dose on your own.

Overdose

Limited experience with overdosages is available. Overdosages of up to 30 times the intended dose have been reported. Almost all cases have had no symptoms and all patients have recovered. On occasion, an overdoseage has been followed by adverse reactions consistent with those listed in the section entitled Side Effects and What to Do About Them:.

Missed dose

Missing even a few doses of Prograf may cause your body to reject your transplanted organ. That is why it is very important to take each dose as your doctor prescribed. If you have trouble remembering doses, or if you are uncertain about how to take them, talk to your doctor, nurse or pharmacist and be sure to discuss any concerns you have about taking Prograf as prescribed.

If you do miss a dose of Prograf do not try to catch up on your own; instead call your doctor or pharmacist right away for advice. It is also a good idea to ask your doctor ahead of time what to do about missed doses.

Never allow your medication to run out between refills and be sure to take enough medication with you when you will be away from home for any extended period of time.


Side Effects for Prograf and What to Do About Them

Like other medicines, Prograf may cause side effects in some people. If you think that you are having side effects, talk to your doctor right away. DO NOT stop taking Prograf on your own.

  • Because Prograf decreases the function of your immune system you may be more likely to get an infection. Tell your doctor right away about any cold or flu-like symptoms (such as fever or sore throat), any mouth sores or burning discomfort with urination.

  • Be sure to tell your doctor right away if you notice any of these symptoms, and especially if they continue, bother you in any way, or seem to increase in intensity:

    • diarrhea, nausea, constipation, vomiting, loss of appetite, stomach pain

    • headache, tremors, convulsions, tiredness or fatigue, difficulty sleeping, nightmares

    • urinary tract infection, weakness

    • decreased or increased urine volumes, kidney or liver problems

    • diabetes/increased blood sugar, swelling or tingling in your hands and feet

    • palpitations, abnormal heart rhythms, chest pain, high blood pressure;

    • fever, back pain, changes in mood or emotions, difficulty in breathing.

  • Immunosuppressive drugs including Prograf may also increase your chances of developing certain types of cancer. The following are possible warning signs of cancer and should be reported to your doctor as soon as possible:

    • any sore that does not heal;

    • unusual bleeding or discharge;

    • the appearance of a lump or thickened areas in your breast or anywhere else on your body;

    • unexplained stomach upset or any trouble with swallowing;

    • any noticeable change in a wart or a mole;

    • a nagging cough or hoarseness;

    • night sweats:

    • persistent and severe headaches;

    • swollen lymph nodes;

    • a change in your bowel or bladder habits.

It is important to regularly tell your doctor how you are feeling and if you have developed any new symptoms while taking Prograf.

This is not a complete list of side effects. For any unexpected effects while taking Prograf, contact your doctor or pharmacist.


About Prograf

IT IS VERY IMPORTANT that you read the following information carefully. Your doctor, nurse, and pharmacist have explained Prograf to you, and this information will answer some of the questions you may have about your new medication. The success of treatment with this drug depends on how carefully you follow your doctor's instructions. As you review this information, write down any questions that you may have. Then, talk with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist. This information should not replace your doctor's or pharmacist's advice.

 

Technical Information